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Click for Ann Arbor, MI Forecast
Let us make your
dream a reality.
801 Airport Drive
Ann Arbor, MI 48108
info@soloaviation.aero
Phone: 734.994.6651
Fax: 734.994.6671
Licenses & Ratings
Private Pilot License
Instrument Rating
Commercial License
Multi-Engine Rating
Flight Instructor
Instrument Instructor
Multi-Engine Instructor
Airline Transport Pilot


Private Pilot License

A Private Pilot's License allows you to be "pilot in command" of an aircraft carrying passengers.  Private pilots have the ability to travel the country and to land at thousands of different airports. 

Although passing a test for a private pilot's license is based on skill and not on hours a minimum of 40 hours of flight are required in the program.  The national average is approximately 70 hours.  It can take from 3 months to 3 years depending on your schedule, but most students complete their license in about a year.

Training is generally separated into 3 units:
1. Pre-Solo (aircraft control and learning how to land)
2. Cross-Country Flying (flying to other airports)
3. Checkride Preparation (preparing for the test at the end)

Students must be at least 16 years old to fly solo and 17 years old to receive this license, however, flight training may begin at an earlier age.  License completion requires passing a computerized knowledge test, an oral exam, and a flight test.
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Instrument Rating

An instrument rating allows a pilot to fly "on instruments" in weather with reduced visibilities such as clouds, fog, and haze. When flying in these conditions, pilots follow instrument flight rules (IFR).

Earning the instrument rating is based on skill and not on hours. Pilots must log at least 50 hours of cross-country flight time as pilot in command (PIC) and at least 40 hours of simulated or actual flight by reference to instruments.  A cross-country of at least 250 nautical miles must also be completed with a flight instructor. 

Instrument training generally involves learning how to "scan" instruments, track courses and airways, fly instrument approaches, and understand how to efficiently utilize the air traffic control system.

License completion requires passing a computerized knowledge test, an oral exam, and a flight test.
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Commercial License

A commercial license allows a pilot to carry passengers and cargo for hire under certain conditions.

Earning the commercial license is based on skill and not on hours. Pilots must have logged a minimum of 250 hours of total flight time prior to receiving the license.   If a pilot already has logged 250 hours, then the commercial pilot license may be obtained in as little as 10 hours in a complex aircraft.  All commercial pilots must receive a complex aircraft endorsement.

Commercial flight training introduces students to new maneuvers to learn energy management and advanced aircraft handling.  Maneuvers for the single-engine rating include chandelles, lazy eights, steep spirals, and eights on pylons.

License completion requires passing a computerized knowledge test, an oral exam, and a flight test.
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Multi-Engine Rating

The multi-engine rating allows pilots to fly twin engine aircraft.  This rating can be "added on" to the private, commercial, and ATP ratings.  Most pilots receive this rating in 10-15 flight hours.

A multi-engine "add-on" requires passing an oral exam and a flight test, but there is no requirement for a computerized knowledge test.
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Flight Instructor

A flight instructor (also known as a certified flight instructor or a CFI) is licensed to train students for the Sport, Recreational, Private Pilot, and Commercial licenses. 

Flight instructors must be able to fly from the right seat of an airplane while teaching.  They are responsible for knowing all private pilot and commercial maneuvers, as well as some additional stall maneuvers.  Flight instructor candidates must also receive a "spin endorsement" certifying that they are capable of recovering from spins and stalls. 

License completion requires passing two computerized knowledge tests, an oral exam, and a flight test.  The checkride, the test at the end, generally lasts several hours and is considered to be one of the most difficult to pass.
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Instrument Instructor

An instrument instructor (also known as a certified flight instructor instrument or CFII) is licensed to train students for their instruments ratings.   Although instructors can earn this as their initial instructor license, it is generally studied as an "add on" to an initial flight instructor rating.

License completion requires passing a computerized knowledge test (two, if it is an initial instructor license), an oral exam, and a flight test.
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Multi-Engine Instructor

A Multi-Engine Instructor (also known as an MEI) is licensed to train students in twin engine aircraft.   Although instructors can earn this as their initial instructor license, it is generally studied as an "add on" to an initial flight instructor rating.

License completion requires passing an oral exam and a flight test.  There is no requirement for a computerized knowledge test, unless it is an initial instructor rating.
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Airline Transport Pilot

An Airline Transport Pilot (ATP) license is a requirement to operate as the captain of most jets, airline flights, and larger aircraft.

Applicants must be at least 21 years old and have a minimum of 1,500 hours of flight time, including 500 hours of cross-country flight time, 100 hours of night flying, and 75 hours in actual or simulated instrument flight conditions.

License completion requires passing a computerized knowledge test, an oral exam, and a flight test.
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